Our Six Research & Implementation Themes

Our vision is to improve the health of the people of Wessex and quality and cost-effectiveness of health care. We will achieve this through a step change in the integration and pathways of care for people with long-term conditions, and reducing the admissions and re-admissions to hospital by using more efficient and appropriate health care.

  • 1. Integrated Respiratory Care

    Our aim is to improve identification, prevention and management for people with asthma and Chronic Obstructive Airways Disease (COPD).

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  • 2. Ageing and Dementia

    Our aim is to identify frail individuals at high risk of poor outcome and evaluate the use of simple assessments in routine care by clinical staff.

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  • 3. Fundamental Care in Hospital

    Research allows us to understand how excellent care can be delivered, to identify systems and approaches to care so that people experience the best possible nursing.

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  • 4. Public Health and Primary Care

    Improving the targetting of antibiotic use and preventing chronic liver disease and acute kidney injury will impact on the health of local populations.

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  • 5. Engagement with Self Directed Support

    We have developed and implemented a social network tool (GENIE) which is being used in a variety of health, social and community settings.

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  • 6. Complexity at End of Life

    Our aim is to improve patient experience at the end of life by investigating the patient transit through the healthcare system.

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NIHR CLAHRC Wessex

University of Southampton

Building 67 E2005

Southampton

SO17 1BJ

General enquiries: 023 8059 7983

Media enquiries: 023 8059 7974

Email: wessexclahrc@soton.ac.uk

Professor Alison Richardson named as NIHR Senior Investigator and Professor Anne Rogers Emeritus

Professor Alison Richardson has been named as an National Institute for ... read more >

Why might nurses miss people’s ‘danger signs’ at night? – Dr Jo Hope

Staff told us it was hard to keep patients safe while making sure they got a decent amount of uninterrupted sleep. They agreed that the most unwell patients should be checked most often. However instead of taking observations according to the early warning protocol, they used their clinical judgement, juggled timings around other ward expectations or skipped observations to avoid waking other patients read blog >

'Celebrating Ageing Research': one day conference
Wed 25th April 10.00 until 16.00
Novotel, Southampton SO15 1RA

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Patient and public involvement is vital to the success of the CLAHRC.

We would be pleased to hear from you if you are interested in becoming involved in our research and implementation.

How can I get involved?